Tag Archive : sleep

Short-term memory, and critical thinking problems?

Today’s fast-paced world demands people be mentally capable of multitasking and their woman-multitaskingbrains functioning at a high level, but this isn’t always the case. Exhaustion, fatigue, stress, and forgetting everyday chores are common, and there may be a good explanation for all this. Some doctors have noted for cases of vitamin B12 deficiencies in people which can cause the symptoms above.

Vitamin B12 is responsible for energy production because it turns carbohydrates and other fats into energy your body can use throughout the day. In addition, vitamin B12 helps with the repair of cells and their growth. Therefore, B12 can help your immune system function properly, while also helping regulate mood and sleep patterns. Even though all these are important for our bodies to function properly, some recent research suggests B12’s major contribution is protecting our brain from wearing down at faster rates.

As we get older, it is natural for our cognitive abilities to decline and challenge our routines. Studies have shown elderly people with low levels of B12 are more susceptible to concentration, short-term memory, and critical thinking problems. This may scare some of you, but we can do something to help combat the natural aging process. We can start taking control of our health and begin by eating healthier foods and beverages. Food and drink alone cannot provide the correct amount of nutrients and vitamins we need to stay healthy and function at maximum capacity, so it becomes necessary to invest in supplements to fill in the missing gaps in our diets.

Our brains drive the car that is our body, so we must take care of it and provide as much support as possible for the brain to work properly. If you can increase the amount of B12 in your system, you can start seeing noticeable, positive changes in your mental faculties. Your memory, thinking, and energy can all improve. Also, your sleep patterns can improve (resulting in a more restful night’s sleep), you can have fewer mood swings, and your immune system can be stronger than ever. Who would have thought ingesting more B12 MIND Brain Health Supplementcould potentially help with so many important aspects of our lives.

To see if our high quality supplements with vitamin B12 product is right for you, check out Mind, Lift, and Lift Caps on our website, lifepriority.com, and start making your health a bigger life priority today.

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.
*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

Energy Boost

With the temperatures reaching record numbers lately, it can be a challenge to get out and do much of anything. Most of us would rather curl up in a dark, air-conditioned room than spend time under the blazing sun outside.

But what if it’s not just the heat that’s making you tired? What if a lack of energy has been a struggle for you for more than the last few months? If so, know that you’re not alone. Millions of Americans feel the same way. That’s why we at Life Priority want to offer a few tips on how to increase your get-up-and-go even when the heat is on!

First, it’s a good idea to examine what may be zapping your energy. Common culprits include lack of sleep, an unbalanced diet, lack of exercise, not enough sunlight, dehydration and, of course, outside forces like cell phones and technology. On top of that, you may be experiencing high stress levels from work or family or have undiagnosed health issues such as anemia, hyperthyroid or low blood sugar. To be completely sure, we encourage you to schedule an appointment with your doctor to get a thorough exam.

While your doctor may discover an internal cause for your lethargy (which is why it’s important to get checked out), there’s a good chance that your energy level could be enhanced simply by incorporating a few changes into your lifestyle.

To start, take a look at your diet. Are you consuming a lot of processed, sugary snacks and beverages? Sugar can cause your blood sugar to spike and then crash, leaving you tired and foggy. Instead of cookies, candy or potato chips, try snacking on fruits or nuts. The protein in nuts sustains you longer than refined sugar, and fruits such as bananas have helpful nutrients like potassium, which converts blood sugar into energy.

Next, get moving! Exercise stimulates blood flow and prevents all kinds of diseases and health problems. It also helps your mentality by releasing feel-good hormones into your body and helps you sleep better at night, which gives you more energy during the day. It doesn’t take much—just 30 minutes a day 3-5 times a week–to feel the effects. Plus, getting out and moving also allows you to unplug from the world and just enjoy nature. (Though, with these temperatures, it might be good to enjoy that nature early in the morning while it’s still tolerable.)

Beyond diet and exercise, it is also important to get enough sleep. Most Americans are underslept, falling far short of the recommended 7-8 hours of sleep per night. This not only decreases energy, but also facilitates diseases and other health issues. Set an alarm in your home to help you remember to head to bed at a time that allows you to get the recommended total of shut-eye. Yes, it will take discipline, but your body will thank you!

With the big three of diet, exercise and sleep being covered, there are also a few other tricks you can try when it comes to increasing your energy. For instance, try popping a mint or chewing a minty gum. The scent ups alertness by stimulating your trigeminal nerve, which is the same nerve that’s activated by smelling salts. Or, consider drinking a cup of green tea. It contains theanine, which calms you while leaving your mind clear. Finally, if possible, take a power nap. According to Harvard research, 30-minute midday naps prevent energy from flagging further, while hour-long naps actually boost energy and performance. And, if all else fails, take the advice of Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., the medical director of the Fibromyalgia and Fatigue Centers and massage your ears. A quick 30-second rub stimulates energizing acupuncture points that give you a quick mental boost.

We Americans are so busy that we don’t often prioritize the things that give us life and vitality. However, if we want to regain our strength and be able to enjoy our day-to-day, we need to start treating our bodies with care and giving them what they need. So, take our advice and get serious about regaining your energy. Talk to your doctor and start incorporating healthy habits into your routine. Then, enjoy the boost of life and joy that comes your way!

 

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.
*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

The Sleeping Brain Decides What to Remember and What to Forget

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Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw’s Life Extension News Volume 16 No. 4 – April 2013

A new paper1 describes the sleep-dependent memory-processing factory that decides what to do with all that information you encountered during the day. As the paper’s authors point out, only some of that information is consolidated so as to become a part of a long-term knowledge base. The paper sifts through evidence from studies of naps, sleep deprivation, correlations of sleep stages and memory processing, sleep physiology, regional brain activity measured during and after sleep with PET and fMRI studies, cellular firing patterns, and synaptic and intracellular measures of plasticity to conclude that there is convincing evidence of sleep processing of memory with improvement of the overall knowledge base.

The authors discuss the new understanding that not all information is uniformly preserved, but that there is an exquisite selection process of memories underway during sleep. For example, they report that emotional memories can be selectively consolidated, especially during rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. It has also been found that memories can be selectively maintained when they contain information on potential monetary rewards. Interestingly, when subjects of sleep memory studies have been told that they would be tested on certain areas of information and not on others provided before sleep, they were found after sleep to have retained more of the information they were told they would be tested on. Hence, the brain “knew” what to do to recall the relevant information.

Moreover, the authors explain, it is possible for the brain to generate new information during the processing of the memory-derived information. “Whether consolidation necessarily precedes these integrative processes (serial processing) is not yet known, but no clear cases of integration without consolidation have been observed. We use the term ‘memory evolution’ to reflect both the qualitative changes that can occur during such integrative processing and the extended time course over which they occur.”1 In gist extraction, the authors refer to the identification of commonalities between items in a collection of memories even when individual item memories are forgotten. Some studies have been found to show that during sleep subjects can extract overarching rules that govern recently studied sets of information, such that understanding of relationships between the sets is improved following sleep.

One study reported by the authors dealt with subjects taught a rote method for solving a class of mathematical problems for which there was a shortcut solution (about which subjects were not told). After a night of post-training sleep, however, subjects were found to be 2.6 times more likely to discover this shortcut than after an equal period of time awake (59.1 versus 22.7% of subjects).1 But, interestingly, even those who did not discover the shortcut benefitted from sleep by improving the speed with which they were able to perform the rote method of solving the problems. Those who became faster without discovering the shortcut improved their speed (using the rote method) three times more than either those who discovered the shortcut or those who remained awake.

This study examines important sleep processes at a systems level rather than at a neurotransmitter level. Understanding sleep involves comprehending its mechanisms from the micro-level details (neuro­transmitters and synapses) to the overarching system architecture.

Reference

  1. Stickgold and Walker. Sleep-dependent memory triage: evolving generalization through selective processing. Nat Neurosci. 16(2):139-45 (2013).