Month: May 2017

Time Is On My Side….Yes, It Is

The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw®life-extension-book
Life Extension NewsTM
Volume 20 No. 2 • March 2017

TIME IS ON MY SIDE … YES, IT IS

by Sandy Shaw

The difference between drug use and addiction or eating and metabolic diseases is time. The amount of time we take a potentially addictive drug determines whether we become addicted; this is also true for eating—eating for only a limited period of time can prevent the development of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes type 2 (Hatori, 2012).

An example of how time can determine the result of eating: a recent study of male mice fed a high fat diet found that restricting feeding to only eight hours a day WITHOUT REDUCING CALORIES as compared to being free to eat at any time prevented metabolic diseases (such as obesity, hyperinsulinemia, fatty liver, and inflammation).

Dopamine is required for the estimation of time by the internal clock. “Interval timing, the ability to discriminate durations in the seconds-to-minutes range, is a form of temporal cognition that requires an optimal level of dopaminergic function in cortico-striatal circuits in order to control time sharing and regulate clock speed.” A time interval is initiated by cortical oscillators in the ventral tegmental area of the brain by a burst of dopamine accompanied by a burst of theta power, which act as the “start gun” (Kononowicz, 2015).

The internal clock is critically controlled by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists. Dopamine agonists such as cocaine and methamphetamine (“speed”) have been shown to increase the speed of the internal clock, while dopamine antagonists such as haloperidol and raclopride have been shown to decrease the speed of the internal clock (Cheng, 2007).

In another study (Sysoeva, 2010), researchers found that there is an association of serotonin (5-HT) related genes with time perception. In their experiment, forty-four Russian Caucasian males (right handed and with a mean age of 22) compared two durations (they had to indicate which of them was shorter) on a computer monitor. “Many studies have reported an association between duration representation parameters and personality, specifically impulsivity and psychoticism.” Unsurprisingly, other studies have found psilocybin, a 5-HT (serotonin) receptor agonist, to affect time perception (Sysoeva, 2010).

“Despite the evidence … suggesting the centrality of DAergic [dopaminergic] modulation in mediating the drug-induced euphoria and timing distortions reported here, this explanation is likely an oversimplification of the processes underlying the individual differences observed in this study. Neuromodulators such as serotonin, GABA, glutamate, and norepinephrine, have also been found to influence time perception and to interact with DA [dopamine] in complex ways (Lake, 2013).” Another neuro­transmitter with important effects on drug addiction and incentive-motivated behaviors is acetylcholine (Lester, 2010).

WHEN TIME SLOWS DOWN

You’ve all experienced it—the times when sudden danger appears, such as your car is about to hit a tree, and time slows release of adrenaline as you rapidly close in on the tree. As explained above, stimulants such as methamphetamine cause a large release of dopamine and this increases the speed of the internal clock. A hypothesis proposes that the reason this feels like time is slowing down is that your brain sees time as the amount of information it processes—the more bits of information is counted as a longer period of time compared to the usual number of bits you experience as “regular” time (Eagleman, 2005).

In a similar fashion, seeing an event in “slow motion” causes observers to believe that more time had passed than actually had (Caruso, 2016). Thus, time is under­estimated.

A very recent paper (Soares, 2016) reported how mice judged the passage of time (judging the duration of intervals). Using a pharmacogenetic method to suppress dopaminergic neuronal activity in the substantia nigra pars compacta, they found that “[s]ituations in which DAergic [dopaminergic] activity is elevated naturally, such as states of high approach motivation, response uncertainty, or cognitive engagement are associated with underestimation of time. Conversely, situations that decrease DAergic activity, such as when fearful or aversive stimuli are presented are associated with overestimation of time.”

The bottom line: “… pleasurable events boost dopamine release, which should cause your internal clock to run faster … so that short intervals seem longer than they are (Simen, 2016).”

FLOW

Time stands still if you go fast enough.

—Stephen F. Kaufman, marial arts professional (Ch.
19 in his book “The Way Of The Modern Warrior”)

Who hasn’t experienced FLOW? The trick is being able to produce it when you want it.

Flow is often described as a state of effortless concentration so deep that people who experience it lose their sense of time. It gives you a sense of acting without conscious awareness, of time slowing down, of perceiving yourself to be moving through a dreamlike state.*
Szxycj at English Wikipedia We knew a highly skilled champion racecar driver (Mickey Thompson) who told us that using a Lift formulation of ours had, in a very long off-road auto race (the BAJA 1000, when it was 1000 miles rather than 1000 kilometers) resulted in time slowing down, with everything happening exactly right and without any conscious effort on his part. He said that it felt like the flow he had experienced in his best races.
The formulation that Mickey took was one of those we designed for our own use that contains the amino acid phenylalanine. Phenylalanine can be converted into tyrosine (which is then converted to dopamine) but also into phenethylamine (also called phenylethylamine), a neuromodulator that provides mental energy like caffeine, but also acts as a stimulus barrier (helps to filter out distractions). Phenylalanine is found in our Lift formulas.

Caffeine provides mental energy in a different way than phenylalanine (see above). Phenylalanine is a natural compound that increases dopamine (via conversion to tyrosine) but, unlike caffeine (a xenobiotic), it does not mimic the effects of amphetamine and cocaine, like caffeine can do at 4-5 times the average human consumption of coffee. At high doses (300-800 mg), caffeine can increase feelings of anxiety, nervousness, and insomnia. Caffeine does NOT have addictive potential at the usual level of human consumption (50-300 mg or 1-3 cups of coffee), but induces feelings of well-being, alertness, energy, and ability to concentrate. Most of the effects of caffeine are reported to take place at adenosine receptors, where caffeine is an inhibitor (Nehlig, 2000). There are other changes, though, which include a 26-30% increase in the densities of cortical muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors; the evidence supports significant alterations in adenosine, adrenergic, serotonergic cholinergic, and GABAergic systems (Shi, 1993).

NUTRIENTS THAT MODIFY THE SPEED OF THE INTERNAL CLOCK

The amino acid tyrosine is precursor to dopamine, that is, converted to dopamine. (The amino acid phenylalanine is converted to tyrosine, so it is an indirect precursor to dopamine.) As noted above, dopamine agonists increase the speed of the internal clock (Cheng, 2007; Meck, 1987). This feels like time is slowing down. (Interestingly, “flow” is a process in which time does feel as though it is slowing down.)

WHEN PLEASURE BECOMES A HABIT

In the scientific literature, addiction is often called habit formation. Habit formation differs immensely from goal-directed activity. Where goal-directed activity is influenced by the outcome of performing an action, addictive activity is not—a negative outcome does not influence it.** If an action is habitual, “then devaluation should have no effect on performance, since habits are elicited by antecedent stimuli which are not affected by devaluation. “… habitual behavior is not controlled by the action-outcome contingency … (Yu. 2009)”

This can be seen in lever pressing by experimental animals. “At first lever pressing is goal-directed and sensitive to manipulation like outcome devaluation. Under certain conditions, it can become more habitual and impervious to changes in the value of the outcome … Studies in flies, mice, rats, horses, monkeys, and humans have shown some version of this transition from more flexible and goal-directed behavior to inflexible and habitual behavior.” (Yu, 2009)

It was purely the feeling that had captivated me, made me sacrifice everything to it, gladly, joyfully. It was a seashell’s pristine whisper in my ear, warm sun rising in my heart, fireflies winking in the nerves.

—Will Bohnaker, Haunts of The Aardwolf, on the allure of caffeine

EATING: DELAY DISCOUNTING

A recent paper (Johnson, 2010) points to a proposal that “deficits in reward processing may be an important risk factor for the development of obesity, and that obese individuals may compulsively consume palatable food to compensate for reward hyposensitivity.” This is another way of saying “self-medication.”

The dopaminergic nervous system is critically involved in the perception of pleasure from eating and sex. In fact, “the degree of pleasure from eating correlates with [the] amount of dopamine release (Stice, 2008).” The chronic overeating of high fat and high sugar foods causes a decrease in the sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons as a result of downregulation (reduced signaling). Animal studies have found similar effects from overeating and also in response to chronic drug use. Both overeating and the use of addictive drugs cause downregulation of dopamine D2 receptors and decreased D2 sensitivity.

A deficiency in the release of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may also be seen in individuals with a certain variant (allele) of the D2 dopaminergic receptor gene, the Taq1A A1 allele; it is interesting to note that this allele is involved in impulsivity, which is defined as “the relative preference for a smaller reward, sooner in time, compared to a larger reward, later in time … (Eisenberg, 2007)” This is called delay discounting—and “non-human research suggests that corticostriatal mesolimic substrates mediate delay discounting performance and that dopamine is the critical neurotransmitter involved.” (Eisenberg, 2007) The famous marshmallow experiments were a particularly notable example of delay discounting.

MONOAMINE OXIDASE A (MAOA) AND IMPULSIVITY

Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is a gene importantly affecting impulsivity. “… the risk imparted by the specific genetic variation studied here [MAOA] contributes to the impulsive dimension of this complex behavior [aggression].” The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene, is of two types—MAOA-L (the low expression variant) and MAOA-H (the high expression variant). MAOA-L is associated with an increased risk of violent behavior. “Arguably, the clearest link between genetic variation and aggression exists for monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) … a key enzyme in the catabolism [breakdown] of monoamines, especially serotonin.” The enzyme catabolizes dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, reducing their availability for signaling at neuronal synapses (Meyer-Lindenberg, 2006). Hence, reduced catabolism, as with the MAOA-L variant, will not decrease the availability of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine for signaling as much as the MAOA-H variant.

Goal-directed dimensions of aggression have been associated with psychopathy, often accompanied by diminished empathy and remorse. In their study (Meyer-Lindenberg, 2006), the researchers found that “men, but not women, carrying the low-expression MAOA genotype showed increased [emotional] reactivity during retrieval of negatively valenced emotional material.” Interestingly, men have only one allele (copy) of the MAOA gene, whereas women have two. The reason for this is that men have only one X chromosome (where the MAOA gene is located), while (of course) women have two. Interestingly, estrogens have been shown to affect the expression of MAOA in the brain (Meyer-Lindenberg, 2006).

Higher dominance has been associated with the low expression variant of MAOA (MAOA-L) and aggression in males in studies of primates.

SEROTONIN AND IMPULSIVITY

As noted above, serotonin deficiency is associated with impulsive behavior. This can be corrected by taking tryptophan, the amino acid that is converted to 5-hydroxytryptophan by the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase and then to serotonin. However, some individuals are unable to make this conversion in sufficient amounts because their version of the enzyme lacks adequate potency. A way to overcome this is to take 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan), which bypasses the need for tryptophan hydroxylase. We suggest taking 25 to 50 mg of 5-HTP at bedtime. We get ours from our Serene Tranquility with 5-HTP.™

DELAY DISCOUNTING MEETS THE GRASSHOPPER AND THE ANT
The Ant and the Grasshopper Another experiment on delay discounting (like the marshmallow experiments) was performed in human subjects, who made a series of choices between early and delayed monetary rewards while they were examined by fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) (McClure, 2004). As a result, the researchers developed a hypothesis for how the brain decides between the early and later rewards. “… we hypothesize that short-run impatience is driven by the limbic system, which responds preferentially to immediate rewards and is less sensitive to the value of future rewards, whereas long-run patience is mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex and associated structures, which are able to evaluate trade-offs between abstract rewards, including rewards in the more distant future.”
They allude to the metaphor of the grasshopper and the ant. The grasshopper spends its time enjoying the present and ignoring what may come later, while the patient ant works diligently preparing for the future. The authors call delay discounting the competition between the “impetuous limbic grasshopper” and the “provident prefrontal ant.” (McClure, 2004).”

In sum, the researchers suggest that “human behavior is often governed by a competition between lower level, automatic processes that may reflect evolutionary adaptations in particular environments, and the more recently evolved, uniquely human capacity for abstract, domain-general reasoning and future planning.”

Another hypothesis on the neuro­chemistry of delay discounting (Kravitz, 2012) proposes that addiction (in which the future consequences of using drugs are ignored) depends upon the interaction between dopamine D1 receptors and dopamine D2 receptors: dopamine D2 receptors counteract dopamine D1 receptors in determining the probability of performing a future action. The D1 receptors induce persistent reinforcement, while the D2 receptors induce transient “punishment” (negative signaling) for the performance of a future action. “In contrast, depression is marked by impaired reinforcement from positive stimuli and heightened punishment from negative stimuli (Kravitz, 2012).”

SPEAKING OF ANTS …

Yes, speaking of ants, a recent paper appeared in the “Research Highlights” section of the 29 Sept. 2016 Nature which reported that ants can get hooked on morphine. The ants were given access to sugar water laced with morphine. Then, over the course of several days, the amount of sugar in the water was reduced while the morphine content was increased, until eventually there was NO sugar in the water, only morphine. The ants, given a choice between sugar water and the sugar-free morphine solution, preferred the sugar-free morphine by 65% to 35%. Plus the ants’ brains showed elevated levels of dopamine, just as addicted mammals do. The authors were said to suggest that ants might make a good model for studying addiction in humans. Durk wonders why 35% of the ants DIDN’T choose morphine … Sandy suggests that maybe those ants had a different version of the D2 dopamine receptor.

HIGH IMPULSIVITY PREDICTS THE SWITCH TO COMPULSIVE COCAINE-TAKING

Rats, like humans, can get addicted to drugs. When rats are exposed to cocaine, 15-20% of them become addicted, which is similar to that observed in humans (Belin, 2008).

“… the essential feature of addiction … [is] … the persistence of drug-seeking in the face of negative consequences …” explain researchers in a 2008 paper (Belin, 2008). In their study, they found that high impulsivity “predicts the development of addiction-like behavior in rats … [and they note that, in humans,] … there is a high comorbidity between drug addiction and disorders characterized by impulsive behavior, such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder.”

Low serotonin levels are thought to be a cause of impulsivity. For example, reducing serotonin levels by tryptophan-restricted diets results in more impulsive choices in experiments. A recent paper (Bevilacqua, 2010) found that a mutation in the serotonin 2B receptor predisposed a Finnish population to severe impulsivity.

Lithium may reduce impulsivity, but studies reporting this association have involved doses much higher than the low-dose form that we use. One such study (in rats) found that a “moderate” dose of lithium (20 mg/kg) suppressed impulsive behavior (Ohmura, 2012). Research involving the low concentrations of lithium found in mineral waters and in some tap water has reported reduced impulsiveness and suicide in people.

Another way to reduce impulsivity is to take tryptophan (precursor to serotonin). See above in “Eating: Delay Discounting.”
Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.

*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.
*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

Six Foods to Eat this Summer

With summer and warm weather comes sweating. With sweating comes higher risks of dehydration and nutrient deficiencies. Combat these risks by eating locally sourced, in season produce. Visit your local farmer’s markets or check for the local section in your grocery store. In season fruits and vegetables contain nutrients that are at their peak, and sourcing them locally means less steps between picking and your kitchen table for them to lose any nutrient properties. Here, we outline 6 summer superfoods that will keep you hydrated and deliver the nutrients you need to keep you healthy all summer long!

  1. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a food with a ton of function. Containing antioxidants such as, vitamin C, they have disease fighting power. The antioxidant that gives tomatoes their red coloring is lycopene. Lycopene is known for its anticancer properties most notably, prostate cancer. Enjoy these in summer salads, as sandwich toppings, or even raw (grape tomatoes are the best for this! Yum!). When cooked, their nutrient availability becomes even stronger so consider a homemade tomato sauce over pasta!

  1. Zucchini

This summer squash variety is full of a certain polysaccharide called pectin. Pectin is linked to heart health benefits by aiding in lowering cholesterol and improving overall arterial health and inflammation. Because of their anti-inflammatory properties, zucchini also protect the GI tract while helping with digestive health. Jump on the latest trend of “zoodles” by spiralizing your zucchini to create long thin noodles that can be substituted as a low carb option. Saute your zoodles and enjoy with pasta sauce or eat zoodles raw in a summer salad.

  1. Watermelon

Watermelon=water! During hot summer days you will need to be replenishing your fluids so you don’t become dehydrated so keep this fruit on hand to mix up your re-hydration regimen. The high water content in watermelon will also keep you satisfied and keep you from having those bad cravings. Like tomatoes, watermelon contains lycopene adding cancer fighting properties and even helps protect skin from sun damage! Watermelon pairs well in salads and can also be enjoyed as is! Use fun-shaped cookie cutters to carve up your watermelon!

  1. Apricots, Peaches & Nectarines

Nectarines and apricots are a great source of dietary fiber aiding in digestion. Additionally, they both are full of vitamin A and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene protects the body from dangerous free radicals. When ingested, beta-carotene is converted to vitamin A aiding in skin, bone and teeth health. As for peaches, their high vitamin C content fights disease and has many skin protection and healing benefits. All of these fruits can be consumed raw or dried. Try peaches in salads or dried apricots mixed in a trail mix snack.

  1. Dark, Leafy Greens

Spinach and kale are the most nutritious of the dark leafy varieties. Similar to nectarines, these greens contain carotenoids which are converted to vitamin A in the body. Most notably, vitamin A protects skin from sun damage which is critical in the summer time. These green veggies also contain the mineral iron which is important for blood and circulation health. When making salads this summer, use both of these greens as the base. Additionally use them as sandwich toppings or try this delicious kale pesto over noodles (or zoodles!).

  1. Strawberries & Blueberries

These summer berries are packed with flavonoids which are high in antioxidants and contain major anti-inflammatory properties. Flavonoids also play a large role in skin health making skin less sensitive to sunlight. Additionally,studies have shown that the flavonoids have slowed cognitive decline in some cases. Enjoy these berries in salads (with dark, leafy greens!) or whip up a delicious mixed fruit salad. Have a sweet tooth? Melt some dark chocolate and dip in some strawberries.


During you next trip to the grocery store or farmer’s market, consider picking up a few of these summer staples. You and your body will be glad you did!

Slowing Up the Aging Process in a Fast-Paced World

In today’s fast-paced lifestyles, most men are faced with increasing mental and physical Greg Royals 1985demands as they age. Personally, I have found that an easy, logical way to slow up my aging process is to keep my body and brain more fit through the use of a few essential supplements with each meal.

I urge all men to consider, at least, the use of the following supplements: a high-quality multi to insure immune support, a potent omega-3 supplement for heart and brain health, specific nutrients that help promote a healthy prostate, and a simple amino sugar (glucosamine) for cartilage health.

I feel that the consistent, daily use of the right nutrients in supplement form (and in adequate amounts!) is one of the most important health decisions that we can make. Based on the past 20 years of being in the dietary supplement industry through my company, Life Priority, and my 16 year career as a pro athlete, I feel strongly that using high-quality supplements is imperative. No matter what you have read or what your doctor, chiropractor, nutritionist, etc. might suggest, your diet is most likely lacking in one or more essential nutrients. You can help yourself feel better and slow up your personal aging process by using high-quality supplements.

I have been involved as a retail customer or a marketer of dietary supplements since 1991. Prior to ’91, I was not aware of the value or importance of getting certain nutrients in my body on a consistent basis. Don’t leave your physical and mental well-being up to anyone else! It’s your life! Your body, including your brain, is aging each day and you can give yourself a better chance at living a healthier (and happier!) life by simply using enough of the right nutrients each day with meals or at bedtime.

Life Priority, Inc., was formed in 1994 to provide customers with time-tested high quality, research-based, scientifically-formulated health and nutritional products. A major life-extension-bookreason that Life Priority was formed was because of the research of 2 scientists who were the co-authors of a NY Times best-seller Life Extension, A Practical Scientific Approach, which was written specifically for doctors. The authors, Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw, wrote Life Extension do that doctors could understand how using certain nutrients in adequate amounts could slow up the aging process.

Durk and Sandy’s multi-vitamin/mineral formula, One Per Meal Lifeguard, contains 25 different nutrients. Each Lifeguard capsule, meant to be used after meals 3 times per day, contains more than the minimum RDA’s. Three other Life Priority products, Omega-3 Priority, Prostate Priority, and Joint Decision/Total Joint Complex provide specific nutrients not contained in the Lifeguard product but do not contain many essential nutrients for specific areas of the body.

Take the advice of someone who, in 1991 at the age of 42, was enlightened by experts in the dietary supplement industry regarding the aging process–get more essential nutrients in your body each day by using “nutrition that you can feel!”

To Your Health!

Greg Pryor-Life Priority Co-Owner and Customer

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.
*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

Invest In Your Health by Adding Life Priority Supplements

Omega-3_dnm_thumb According to several government studies, more than half of all Americans take at least one supplement every day, most commonly a multivitamin or omega-3 supplement. The reason most often cited for taking dietary supplements is to fill in nutritional gaps. The commercial food supply has experienced a significant reduction in several essential nutrients within the last 60 years, due mostly to irresponsible agricultural practices.

Some of the nutrients that are virtually missing from the modern American diet include magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins E, C and A. While a diet rich in healthy and nutritious foods is always best, it won’t always supply everything that you need. Here are some of the ways in which dietary supplements can give your good health a boost. You’ll be in a better mood, have better results, and get the most from your exercising.

Nervous System Support
Your nervous system relies on nutrients such as B vitamins, magnesium and potassium to function properly. Vitamins in the B group, especially B12 and B9, assist with energy metabolism. Magnesium and potassium, both electrolyte minerals, regulate the electrical impulses that control heart rhythm and muscle contractions. Having low electrolytes, particularly magnesium, is known to cause heart attack and poor strength.
Better Moods
Vitamins, minerals and fatty acids have a profound impact on how you feel. Minerals such as copper, magnesium and zinc are important to your brain’s ability to produce serotonin and other mood-boosting neurotransmitters. Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins A and D have been shown to reduce the likelihood of depression in people who take them as supplements. Some vitamins and minerals have even been proven to shorten or prevent episodes in people with psychotic disorders.
Sports with other people is a great combination with supplements and vitamins, because it gives you a chance to interact with the people around you in your healthy lifestyle, giving you friendly quality time with people as well as an opportunity to maximize your body’s workout.

Higher Testosterone
Low testosterone is associated with fatigue, fat gain, low libido, inability to maintain muscle and cognitive decline. Healthy testosterone levels in both men and women depend upon having good intake of things like magnesium, zinc and vitamins A and C. Vitamin A, not to be confused with beta carotene, is a particularly difficult one to get from food these days. Today, the only real food sources are wild-caught fish, wild game and cod liver oil.

Vegan and Vegetarian Health
A vegan or vegetarian diet is considered to be very healthy, but unfortunately, it’s not a nutritionally balanced diet. Human beings were designed to eat an omnivorous diet. We require certain nutrients, such as vitamin B12 and various amino acids, that can only be found in significant amounts in meat and other animal products. Therefore, it is important for vegans and vegetarians to supplement their diets with anything that might be missing.

Apple download 3.10.2016 490
Stay current with your good health, visit lifepriority.com to find Omega-3, Lifeguard, Lift/Lift Caps and other multivitamins to supplement and compliment your diet.

Invest in your Health and Make your Life a Top Priority! I am glad I Did!

Michelle Pryor, Life Priority co-owner, #1 Customer!

 

HOW TO TAKE NIACIN THE RIGHT WAY

HOW TO TAKE NIACIN THE RIGHT WAYlife-extension-book

Oh, yes, there is a right way to take high-dose immediate release niacin. Take it at the right time and you can get a host of health benefits, especially reduced triglycerides, LDL, and VLDL and increased HDL—at the wrong time, you lose some of these benefits. Here’s why.

Niacin causes cellular metabolism to switch from primarily using glucose as a fuel to primarily using fats, except in the heart, where lipids are the primary fuel and niacin causes a switch to glucose (Carlson, 2005). This switch takes place postprandially, that is, right after you eat, which is when you experience the highest level of blood fats, high enough to increase the risk of a heart attack. That is why some people have a heart attack after eating a heavy meal.

The process of being able to switch between using metabolic substrates is termed metabolic flexibility … (Virtue, 2012).

After eating, fats are taken up and stored by adipose tissue, which releases fatty acids (a process called lipolysis) to the liver and to muscles. “During the fed state, net lipid flux into adipose tissue increases, whereas in the fasted state net lipid efflux predominates” (Virtue, 2012). Niacin prevents lipolysis, the release of these fatty acids from adipose tissue into the bloodstream. (The liver uses the fatty acids to produce triglycerides. The reduction in the availability of free fatty acids for the liver to make triglycerides is why niacin causes a reduction in triglycerides (Virtue, 2012; Kroon, 2017).

There is a strong negative correlation between plasma triglyceride levels and the concentration of HDL—as the level of triglycerides go up, HDL levels go down. The major components of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) are triglycerides derived from the liver; the VLDL then carry triglycerides in the bloodstream. Reduction of the synthesis of triglycerides in the liver by niacin importantly increases HDL and reduces VLDL.

During the periods when you haven’t eaten (or at night when you sleep), your cells primarily use fats as primary fuel. Taking niacin can’t “switch” the choice of metabolic fuel to fats when you are already using fats as a fuel, but it can reduce the ability of cells to use glucose, which is why some people have a small increase in blood glucose when they use niacin. “We suggest that postprandial FFA [free fatty acid] lowering is the primary mechanism driving the metabolic improvements resulting from NiAc [nicotinic acid, niacin] timed to feeding. Reduced FFA supply to the tissues lowers substrate competition with glucose and improves insulin sensitivity just when it is needed the most (i.e., during the influx of dietary carbohydrate in the postprandial phase), resulting in reduced postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia (Kroon, 2017).”

Thus, the best way to use niacin as a supplement is to take it during or just after a meal, not at other times.

This, incidentally, is one reason why we do not recommend using extended-release niacin: it does not limit niacin to the times when it is best to take it, during or just after a meal.

THE EFFECTS OF EMOTIONAL STRESS REDUCED BY NIACIN

Another potential benefit from taking niacin is that niacin has been shown in healthy human subjects to reduce the elevated fatty acids and triglycerides that resulted from 2 hours of emotional stress as compared to similar human subjects receiving the same emotional stress but no niacin. (Carlson, 2005, p. 99)

References

Carlson. Nicotinic acid: the broad-spectrum lipid drug. A 50th anniversary review. J Int Med. 258:94-114 (2005).

Kroon et al. Nicotinic acid timed to feeding reverses tissue lipid accumulation and improves glucose control in obese Zucker rats. J Lipid Res. 58:31-41 (2017).

Virtue et al, A new role for lipocalin prostaglandin D synthase in the regulation of brown adipose tissue substrate utilization. Diabetes. 61:3139-47 (2012).

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.

*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.

*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

Higher Levels of Vitamin D Associated With Improvements in Certain Aspects of Cognitive Function in Middle-aged and Older European Men

The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw®
Life Extension NewsTM
Volume 12 No. 5 • October 2009life-extension-book

Higher Levels of Vitamin D Associated With Improvements in Certain Aspects of Cognitive Function in Middle-aged and Older European Men

A  paper1 reports on the association between Vitamin D and cognition in 3,369 men aged 40–79 years from eight centers enrolled in the European Male Ageing Study. Tests for different aspects of cognition were included. There was no significant difference between those with high levels of 25(OH)D and those with lower levels except in the DSST test. The DSST test is described in the paper as a “subtest adopted from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales and provides a reliable measure of psychomotor speed and visual scanning. Participants were asked to make as many correct symbol-for-digit substitutions as possible within a 1 minute period.”

The authors conclude: “Although we were unable to specifically explain this observation [the significant association between 25(OH)D levels and DSST scores], the DSST appears robust . . . .” However, note that the association between 25(OH)D and DSST score was only significant among the older men, that is, those aged 60–69 and 70–79.

Lee et al. Association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and cognitive performance in middle-aged and older European men. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 80:722-9 (2009).

FDA Disclaimer’s
Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.
Information provided for educational purposes only. *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.
*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

LIVE LONGER WITH VITAMIN D3

The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw®life-extension-book
Life Extension NewsTM
Volume 20 No. 1 • February 2017

LIVE LONGER WITH VITAMIN D3
or
LIVE LESS LONG WITH LESS VITAMIN D3

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many chronic disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, infections, immune deficiency, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, heart failure, sudden cardiac death, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease (Gruber, 2015). But, even more than that, low vitamin D levels in serum are associated with increased mortality. In fact, in a recent meta-analysis of 42 randomized trials, taking vitamin D for three years or longer resulted in a significant 6% reduction in all-cause mortality.

In another meta-analysis (this one included 73 observational studies and 22 randomized controlled trials with 849,412 and 30,716 participants respectively), the observational studies were reported to show that “[e]ach decline of 25(OH)D [vitamin D] by 10 ng/mL was associated with a 16% increased risk of all-cause mortality (Gruber, 2015).”

Importantly, however, different forms of Vitamin D have different effects. In the randomized clinical trials noted in the paragraph above, “where vitamin D2 (dose range: 208-4500 IU/day) or vitamin D3 (dose range: 10-6000 IU/day) were given alone vs placebo or no treatment, vitamin D3 significantly reduced the mortality by 11%, whereas vitamin D2 increase[d] the mortality by 4%.” (The increased mortality seen with vitamin D2 was, however, seen with lower doses (<600 IU/day) and shorter average periods of supplementation (less than 1.5 years).) Vitamin D3 is the form of vitamin D that the two of us take.

A third meta-analysis that included 32 studies from January 1966 to January 2013 with more than 500,000 people (about 55 years old), found that serum 25(OH)D levels less than or equal to 30 ng/mL were associated with greater all-cause mortality, as compared to levels over 30 ng/mL. The authors of this meta-analysis also noted that the cutoff point for a deficient intake of vitamin D (20 ng/mL), as recommended by the federal government’s Institute of Medicine was too low to get all the health benefits of vitamin D (e.g., reduced risk of all-cause mortality and diseases such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, etc.). They suggested that the cutoff point should “not be set at 20 ng/mL, but at 30 ng/mL (Gruber, 2015).”

It is notable that the “Institute of Medicine recommended a daily tolerable upper intake (UL) for vitamin D for persons of nine years and older of 4000 IU and the Endocrine Society recommended for adults an UL of 10,000 IU vitamin D (Gruber, 2015).” We take 16,000 IU/day to attain a minimum-mortality sweet spot value of 60 ng/ml. NOTE: Do not take more than 10,000 IU/day unless you also have a blood test to verify that you are not taking too much.

It is also interesting to know that “obese individuals needed 2.5 times more vitamin D to raise the blood levels of 25(OH)D to the same degree as a normal weight person (Gruber, 2015).”

In conclusion, vitamin D3 is an inexpensive way to obtain a variety of potentially important health benefits, including the possibility of living longer.

Reference

Gruber et al. Live longer with vitamin D? Nutrients. 7:1871-80 (2015).

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.

*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.

*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

Magnesium Reduces All-Cause Mortality, Including Stroke, Heart Failure, And Diabetes-

The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw®
Life Extension NewsTM
Volume 20 No. 2 • March 2017

MAGNESIUM REDUCES ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY, INCLUDING STROKE, HEARTlife-extension-book FAILURE, AND DIABETES

A very recent paper (Fang, 2016) examined the association between dietary magnesium and health. In this dose-response meta-analysis from 40 prospective cohort studies that included over one million (1,000,000) participants, the researchers found that, for each 100 mg/day increase in magnesium intake, the risk of stroke decreased by 7% (RR (relative risk):0.93; 95% CI (confidence interval):0.89-0.97, and was associated with a 10% lower risk of mortality. The highest category of magnesium intake, as compared to the lowest category, was found in the participants to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (RR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.69-0.80).

“A dose-response analysis revealed that a 100 mg/day increase in dietary magnesium intake is significantly associated with a 7%, 22%, 19%, and 10% decrease in the risk of stroke, heart failure, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality.” However, there was no clear association between magnesium and the risk of cardiovascular disease. In the U.S. and in Europe, the daily intake of magnesium does not generally meet the recommended amount. Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of serum magnesium are associated with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease, among others (Fang, 2016).

We highly recommend taking supplemental magnesium. We take 400-600 mg per day of magnesium from our Magnesium Priority.™

Reference

Fang et al. Dietary magnesium intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. BMC Med. 14:210 (2016)

Life Priority, established in 1994, offers supplements that are scientifically-formulated, results-oriented, and GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and are manufactured at USDA and FDA inspected facilities.

*Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.

FDA Structure/Function Claims

life-priority-logo

Life Priority, since 1994, has undergone two FDA inspections and would love to make you aware of the importance of the FDA and their involvement in the health and nutrition industry. Please see below the current structure/function claims that regulate and support the education of consumers.  We appreciate the ability to support you and your health with scientifically formulated, FDA inspected, health and nutritional products. The most important investment you can make is in your health and well-being.

 

FDA Supplement Structure Function Claims:

Dietary Supplements 

Structure/function claims have historically appeared on the labels of conventional foods and dietary supplements as well as drugs. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) established some special regulatory requirements and procedures for structure/function claims and two related types of dietary supplement labeling claims, claims of general well-being and claims related to a nutrient deficiency disease. Structure/function claims may describe the role of a nutrient or dietary ingredient intended to affect the normal structure or function of the human body, for example, “calcium builds strong bones.” In addition, they may characterize the means by which a nutrient or dietary ingredient acts to maintain such structure or function, for example, “fiber maintains bowel regularity,” or “antioxidants maintain cell integrity.” General well-being claims describe general well-being from consumption of a nutrient or dietary ingredient. Nutrient deficiency disease claims describe a benefit related to a nutrient deficiency disease (like vitamin C and scurvy), but such claims are allowed only if they also say how widespread such a disease is in the United States. These three types of claims are not pre-approved by FDA, but the manufacturer must have substantiation that the claim is truthful and not misleading and must submit a notification with the text of the claim to FDA no later than 30 days after marketing the dietary supplement with the claim. If a dietary supplement label includes such a claim, it must state in a “disclaimer” that FDA has not evaluated the claim. The disclaimer must also state that the dietary supplement product is not intended to “diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease,” because only a drug can legally make such a claim. For more information about the difference between structure/function claims and disease claims, see 21 CFR 101.93, entitled “Certain Types of Statements for Dietary Supplements,” and FDA’s January 6, 2000 final rule entitled “Regulations on Statements Made for Dietary Supplements Concerning the Effect of the Product on the Structure or Function of the Body” (65 Fed. Reg. 1000).

 

For more information about the FDA and supplements, please visit the link below:

https://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/labelingnutrition/ucm2006881.htm

Green Machine: The Power of a Simple Green Smoothie

At first glance (okay, maybe also at second and third) green smoothies can look like the most unappealing thing that you would ever want to ingest, but it may be time to reconsider. Sure, they don’t look delicious, but in reality they can be, and best of all, they pack a nutritious punch. A green smoothie can be your one stop, portable meal that fulfills most of your essential nutrient needs. Here, we highlight a mild recipe for all of you novice smoothie drinkers out there. With tropical fruit to naturally sweeten up the bitterness of the spinach, you would never know that this would be considered healthy. We have also included a scoop of Whey of Life for some added protein. Don’t worry the protein powder won’t alter the taste of your smoothie because our product is flavorless!

Using spinach as the base, you will be supplied with a strong dose of vitamin K and iron, both of which are great for bone health, heart health, and hair and nail strength. Also, vitamin K has been known to have anticancer properties . Throw in some bananas for a potassium boost and the pineapple and mango provide you with a vitamin C cocktail to keep your immune system in check. The added Whey of Life protein will help in re-building your lean muscle mass and equip you with an energy “pick-me-up”. Not to mention, the protein will fill you up and make your smoothie meal seem satisfying.igor-ovsyannykov-223090

When purchasing your ingredients consider visiting your local farmer’s markets. Locally sourced produce tends to be healthier and fresher. Many farmers participating in farmer’s markets often use organic farming methods to grow their products, so you have a better chance of purchasing foods that are void of chemicals and other unsafe modifications. These fresher options taste better overall ensuring that your smoothie will taste great no matter how green and unappealing it may look. Remember, green is good! Now all you need is a blender, try our recipe below and let us know what you think in the comments!