Month: April 2013

Happy Mother’s Day! Take Care of the Team Captain-You!

639-02030138

Hats off to the Mother’s……Mom’s! Take Care of the Team Captain—You!

As a former player in MLB for over 9 seasons, I sometimes reflect on my early years and what happened then that helped me end up being on a World Series Championship team (KC Royals in ’85).  In the late ’50’s, when I was playing in the Hot Stove League in Akron, Ohio (the old time name for Little League), my mother always made sure that my needs were taken care of before my ballgames.  Mom made sure that I was fed properly, that I had my hat and glove, that I had a clean uniform, and that I was at the game on time. I took her and her services for granted and now, as I look back, I wonder who was taking care of her needs?

If you are a mom (or a dad) helping your young athlete become all that he or she can be, are you sure that you are taking care of your specific needs too since, in my opinion, you are the captain of your family team!  You cannot afford to end up on the “bench”.  The following information gives you one easy way to keep your head and body in the game!

Every article that I write for KC Sports and Fitness magazine has been about the importance of using enough specific (essential) nutrients in the right form and quantities every day.   One specific essential nutrient that everyone, especially all you mothers, needs to get every day is omega-3 fatty acid.  Omega-3 is called an essential fatty acid: It’s essential to health, and because the human body doesn’t produce it, it’s essential in the diet. Unfortunately, the typical American diet includes relatively few foods that are rich in omega-3.

Considering that it is difficult to get enough omega-3 from our diet, I suggest that the next best way to get the balance is in supplement form via fish oil.  It is essential for so many of our working parts, especially our brain.

Scientific evidence suggests omega-3s help regulate mental health problems because they enhance the ability of brain-cell receptors to comprehend mood-related signals from other neurons in the brain. In other words, the omega-3s are believed to help keep the brain’s entire traffic pattern of thoughts, reactions, and reflexes running smoothly and efficiently.

Researchers have discovered a link between mood disorders and the presence of low concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids in the body.  Omega-3 is used to regulate blood clotting, build cell membranes and support cell health.

Omega-3 also curbs inflammation. While inflammation is a normal part of the body’s immune response, research indicates that it also underlies a host of many benefits, including cardiovascular health, and autoimmune diseases.

There are plenty of Omega-3 dietary supplement products in the marketplace.  Choose wisely!  I suggest that you consider the Life Priority product, Omega-3 Priority because it is concentrated (60% EPA/DHA vs. normal 30%), a pharmaceutical-grade, deodorized (no fishy tasting burping), and from a pristine source in deep sea waters.

To Your Health!

Greg Pryor

Contact us at 800-787-5438 or www.lifepriority.com

Have a “HYDRATED” Summer!

by Greg Pryor

With the hot days of summer come great summer sports — golf, baseball, tennis and lemon-water-pitcherfootball –in our neighborhoods and on vacation. Before you (or your kids) go out for a long day of fun in the sun — learn to hydrate and protect you and your family against the dangers of dehydration and heat illness.

Dehydration is a frequent problem during summer, when heat and temperature rise above 45 degrees centigrade. Dehydration is a phase that happens when body loses more water than it consumes or holds. Dehydration can occur due to sunstroke when excess body fluids are lost due to the sun’s heat. It can also be caused when you do extensive workouts in the scorching heat. Dehydration can also occur when you have a high temperature and your body tries to sweat more to reduce the body temperature.

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends that athletes drink 16 ounces of fluid — two full glasses — a couple of hours before starting practice or exercise. That means weekend hikers or bikers should drink up before they venture out. I simply add 2 more ounces of water in the summer months every time I drink Lift, Mind or Muscle Memory!

Simple Tips to help prevent dehydration in summer:

  • Drink sufficient water in summer prior to going out in the sun.  An average person should be taking at least 8 ounces of fluid–either water or other healthy fluid to prevent loss of fluids in summer. ( “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.” That’s about 1.9 liters, which isn’t that different from the Institute of Medicine recommendations. Although the “8 by 8” rule isn’t supported by hard evidence, it remains popular because it’s easy to remember.)
  • Avoid sugar: Sodas, fruit juices and alcohol have a high level of sugar (which means more calories per serving) than most sports drinks or water. These drinks can rehydrate your body because they contain water, but their sugar content gives the stomach and intestines more to deal with.  As a result, the fluids aren’t absorbed into the body as quickly.
  • Use loose fitted white or light colored dress with half sleeves. Don’t wear dark dress in summer in order to keep body temperature normal and dress plays a very important part in preventing dehydration.
  • Eat lots of fleshy and juice fruits in summer to restore some of the body fluids, which are lost in the course of the day. Eat ripe mango, water melons and family fruits and vegetables to help  replenish body fluids. *My personal favorite is watermelon.
  • Avoid direct sun and high humidity without sufficient rest and fluids.
    • Children face a much greater risk of dehydration and heat-related illness. A child’s body surface area makes up a much greater proportion of his/her overall weight than an adult’s, which means they are at a greater risk for dehydration.
    • Early signs of dehydration include fatigue, thirst, dry lips and tongue, lack of energy, and feeling overheated. But if kids wait to drink until they feel thirsty, they’re already dehydrated. Thirst doesn’t really kick in until a child has lost 2% of his or her body weight as sweat.
    • Seek Medical  Advice If you have any concerns.

A ounce of prevention (or 8 oz of water!) may be better than the cure!

Life Priority wishes you and your family a happy, healthy summer!

Life Priority, Inc.

11184 Antioch Rd., #417,

Overland Park, KS 66210

Order Life Priority health products at www.lifepriority.com

Order at 1-800-787-5438 or in the Kansas City area call 913-438-5433

Information provided for educational purposes only. Not intended to replace medical advice of your healthcare advisor

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Information provided for educational purposes only. *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.

The Importance of Sleep

Coffee Eater

The Brain-Franklin Institute-http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/sleep.html

You have been entrusted with the care and feeding of the most extraordinary and complex creation in the universe. Home to your mind and personality, your brain houses your cherished memories and future hopes. It orchestrates the symphony of consciousness that gives you purpose and passion, motion and emotion.

But what do you really know about it?

Here you can get to know your brain – the food it likes, the challenges it craves, the rest it requires, the protection it deserves.

The  benefits of healthy sleep on every part of your body.

By Jennifer Acosta Scott

Medically reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH

Being asleep may seem like the ultimate form of inactivity, but those unconscious hours are actually a time of hard work for your body. Sleeping is one way that your body recovers from damage and protects itself against illness, says Michael Twery, PhD, director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research for the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. “Sleep is one part of the whole rhythm of life,” Twery says.“Whenever researchers go in and disrupt that rhythm, the biology becomes less efficient. And that inefficiency basically leads to disease.” Here’s a head-to-toe look at how sleep revives the various parts of your body.

Brain Health

Surprisingly, most people need only three to four hours of sleep a night to maintain minimal cognitive brain function, the processes responsible for carrying out everyday things like driving a car or getting dressed. But “if you have to solve a problem that requires attention and focused thinking, that will be difficult” on such little sleep, Twery says. To properly execute a difficult project at work, for example, your brain needs seven to eight hours of sleep. Your brain also needs that much rest to most efficiently carry out “automatic” tasks like hormone secretion.

Skeletal System Health

Eating calcium-rich foods is not all you need to do to strengthen your bones. Adequate amounts of sleep are necessary for healthy bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside the bones that contains stem cells, which eventually form blood cells in the body. “We get stem cells and immune cells from bone marrow,” Twery says.“Healthy sleep is part of that.”

Face and Skin Health

Ever feel ugly after a night with little rest? It might not just be your imagination. Several years ago, a small Swedish study found that people who were photographed after 31 hours of sleep deprivation were perceived as less healthy and attractive than when they were photographed after a full night of sleep. “If you’re sleep-deprived, that’s correlated with appearing unwell and tired, which can make you seem less attractive,” says Carl Bazil, MD, PhD, director of the neurology division of the Columbia Sleep Disorders Center at the Neurological Institute of New York City. This effect may have something to do with the correlation between sleep deprivation and elevated levels of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol.“Those stress factors do compromise the health of skin,” Twery says.

Heart Health

Consistently skimping on needed rest can have detrimental effects on the old ticker. Sleep deprivation can send the body’s sympathetic nervous system into overdrive, causing the release of greater amounts of the hormone adrenaline. “This tells the body’s tissues to be prepared to take immediate action,” Twery says. “It makes the heart work harder.” People who are sleep-deprived are at greater risk for developing hyperlipidemia, or high cholesterol, which can lead to heart attack or stroke. So do your heart a favor and get to bed early tonight.

Immune System Health

If you don’t get adequate sleep, you could find yourself sick a lot more often. Research has found that people are more likely to catch the common cold when they are behind on their rest. “Obviously we worry about [colds] more from a convenience standpoint, but there’s a concern that for more serious types of infections, the same thing may be going on,” Dr. Bazil says. Researchers have also discovered that rest can help you get more benefits from preventive vaccines — a study published in the journal Sleep found that people produced more antibodies in response to the hepatitis B vaccine when they had adequate sleep.

Healthy Weight

People often consume too many calories when they are sleep-deprived, which can lead to weight gain. Why? Being behind on sleep can disrupt the body’s balance between ghrelin and leptin, two hormones that stimulate and suppress appetite, respectively. “Sleep deprivation contributes to moving that ratio in the direction of increasing appetite,” Twery says. “It’s like you’re attempting to compensate for the stress [of being tired].” The lesson? Aim for a full night’s sleep every night and be mindful of your food intake on those occasions when you don’t get enough shut-eye.

Liver Health

Like the rest of your body, your liver — your largest internal organ —is attuned to a certain rhythm that varies with the time of day. For example, the liver produces the most cholesterol in the evening hours. Being behind on sleep can throw off this rhythm, making it less able to efficiently carry out functions like detoxifying, breaking down adrenaline, and managing blood sugar levels. “It doesn’t respond well when the liver clock is desynchronized,” Twery says. Yet another reason to get your rest tonight.

Sexual Health and Fertility

If you’re chronically shorting yourself on sleep, you could find that your sex life suffers. “People who don’t sleep enough are going to have less interest in sex and decreased performance,” Bazil says. This could be because of sleep’s ability to keep the body’s hormones in balance — a lack of sleep can throw hormones, including those related to sexual function, out of whack. For example, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that a week of restricted sleep (five hours a night) led to a reduction in testosterone levels.

Information provided for educational purposes only. *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
*The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.